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[MANGA TALK]

Shoujos of the classic 80’s

I really lost track when I tried to count those famous mangakas who made their debuts in the 80’s; there was just so many of them, that eventually I decided to abandon my pathetic attempt! Anyway, to continue my blah on “Retro Shoujos”from the previous posts re. vintage 70’s shoujo manga….

By the end of 1970’s, the scope of genres for shoujo manga was widely broadened under the influence of Year 24 Group. Nonetheless, as the manga industry expanded with the growing numbers (and ages) of the female readers, manga magazines (and publishing houses) were forced to acquire an even wider breadth and diversity on the scope of genres in order to meet the vast and varying demands in the market.

Notably, pop culture flourished in the 1980’s, namely rock and pop music, as seen in SAEKI Kayono’s Hoshi Renge , TADA Kaoru’s Aishite Night, as well as Watanabe Taeko’s Hajime-chan ga Ichiban!. Meanwhile, Japan also saw itself facing with increasing numbers of society issues, which were often associated with bōsōzoku or youth-related matters. The public society was beginning to be “challenged” by the younger generation with the attempts of establishing individual identities, or “finding one self”. This kind of youth phenomenon can be found in TSUMUGI Taku’s Hot Road, for example.

 TSUMUGI Taku’s Hot Road

The “explosion” of creativity in shoujo manga as seen in the 70’s continued in the 80’s. Many young mangakas who made their debuts in the mid/ late 70’s began to find their fames in the 80’s; some of these mangakas included MAKIMURA Satoru (e.g. her Ai no Aranjuez, 1978) and NARITA Minako (notable for her Alien Toori, 1981 and Cipher, 1985). In general, shoujo manga of the 80’s focused more on relationships, feelings and moods, as opposed to, for instance, an action-packed sports story such as YAMAMOTO Sumika’s Aim for the Ace! In effect, the new styles of artwork and story-telling tend to become less complex more direct and simple, as opposed to a grand and luxury setting as seen in, e.g. Orpheus no Mado by IKEDA Ryoko.

Nevertheless, sparkling eyes and “whao-ho-ho” laughs, alongside other 70’s signature styles of art could still be found in the work of many shoujo mangakas, such as HARA Chieko (e.g. Niji no Densetsu, 1985).

Equally, romanticism remained as the core theme of the mainstream shoujo manga in the 80’s. In terms of character designs, the heroines were created as boyish, loud, rude, clumpsy, timid but strong-will, non-domestic, eccentric, smart and decisive, foxy and schematic, or anything but different from the normally expected characteristics of a typical female teenager/ adult of Japanese’s modern society. Nonetheless,  the “go get the boy and live happily ever-after” would still be the central focus for our heroines from the 80’s. : )

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NB. Since I was looking mainly at the mainstream shoujos, I have not covered much on “dōjinshi”, for which the artists included OZAKI Minami (notable for her Zetsuai, 1989) and CLAMP in the early days. In the 80’s, the genre of shonen-ai has spun-off and, in many ways has been derived to become “Boys Love” through the works of “dōjinshi”….

Back to VINTAGE 70′s  

Next —> Old school 90’s

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GALLERY

Below some examples of the “next generation” mangakas (after “Year 24 Group”) and their works in the 80’s

For other mangakas of the 80’s, click here

1980

ASAGIRI Yuu
(あさぎり夕)

Ashita Kara Hero
あしたからのHERO
NARITA Minako
(成田美名子)

Alien Toori
エイリアン通り
NAKA Tomoko
(名香智子)

PARTNER
パートナー
TAKAHASHI Chizuru
(高橋千鶴)

Kokuriko-Zaka kara
コクリコ坂から

1981

MAKIMURA Satoru
(槇村さとる)

Dancing Generations
ダンシング・ゼネレーション
MORIKAWA Kumi
(森川久美)

Nankinro ni Hanafubuki
南京路に花吹雪
TADA Kaoru
(多田かおる)

Aishite Night
愛してナイト
KAWASOU Masumi
(河惣益巳)

Touring Express
ツーリング・エクスプレス

1982

IKENO Koi
(池野恋)

Tokimeki Tonight
ときめきトゥナイト
UCHIDA Yoshimi
(
内田善美)
Hoshi no Tokei no Liddell
星の時計のLiddell

1983

AKAISHI Michiyo
(赤石路代)
Alpine Rose
アルペンローゼ
KAWAHARA Yumiko
(川原由美子)

Zenryaku Milk House
前略・ミルクハウス

1984

SHINOHARA Chie
(篠原千絵)

Yami no Pāpuru Ai
闇のパープル·アイ
IWADATE Mariko
(岩館真理子)

1-gatsu ni wa Christmas
(1月にはChristmas)
NAGAOKA Yoshiko
(長岡良子)

Kodai Gensou Romance Series
古代幻想ロマンシリーズ
ONO Hiromu
(小野弥夢)
Lady Love

1985

MATSUNAE Akemi
(松苗あけみ)

Junjou Crazy Fruit
純情クレイジーフルーツ
YOSHINO Sakumi
(吉野朔実)

Shounen wa Kouya wo Mezasu
少年は荒野をめざす
SOURYO Fuyumi
(惣領冬実)

Boyfriend
ボーイフレンド
NAKAJI Yuki
(なかじ有紀)

Koyamasou no Kiraware Mono
小山荘のきらわれ者

1986

YOSHIDA Akimi
(吉田秋生)

BANANA FISH
NASU Yukie
(那州雪絵)

Koko wa Greenwood
(ここはグリーン・ウッド)
TSUMUGI Taku
(紡木たく)

HOT ROAD
ホットロード
YOSHIMURA Akemi
(吉村明美)

Kirinkan Graffiti
麒麟館グラフィティ

1987

ITSUKI Natsumi
(樹 なつみ)

Hanasakeru Seishounen
花咲ける青少年
HIWATARI Saki
(日渡早紀)

Boku no Chikyuu o Mamotte
ぼくの地球を守って

1988

SOURYO Fuyumi
(惣領冬実)

THREE 3
YACHI Emiko
(谷地恵美子)

Pii Natsu ga Ippai
(ぴー夏がいっぱい)/ 热情仲夏

1989

HARUNO Nanae
(榛野なな恵)

Papa told me
OUSAKA Mieko
(逢坂みえこ)

Eien no Nohara
永遠の野原
WATANABE Taeko
(渡辺多恵子)

Hajime-chan ga Ichiban!
はじめちゃんが一番!
SAEKI Kayono
(佐伯かよの)

Hi no Ryousen
緋の稜線



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Discussion

3 thoughts on “Shoujos of the classic 80’s

  1. Fantastic list! I’m so happy you mentioned “Hot Road” in your list—it was so influential in the late 80’s, and it saddens me that none of the newer manga readers have ever heard of her, let alone this classic. Kuramochi Fusako was another mangaka whom I adore from this time period— and who can forget Ikuemi Ryou (although her career peak came more during the early 90’s, she did debut in the 80’s afterall!).

    I wish Bouquet manga anthology would come back— they were really theonly manga anthology that gave a chance to mangakas who didn’t have stellar art but whose writing more than made up for anything lacking in the art side of things. It just hasn’t been the same since it folded in the early 90’s 😦

    Posted by japanesenovels | October 26, 2011, 6:28 am
    • Hi, welcome and thanks for visiting here!

      Just been reading some of your posts in your blog, which was really interesting! I am always fascinated by the art and skills in translating an Asian language ( Japanese and Chinese, say) into English. Some of the terms and words would be very hard, if not impossible, to be translated directly into simple english… anyway, wish all the best for your blog – 顽张ってください! ^^

      Coming back to the manga… Ah yes, Ikuemi Ryou! I actually listed her in “mangakas of the 90’s”, simply because as you said, her work became notable in the 90’s although debuted in the mid/late 80’s……. Have not read much of her work… is there any of her series that you would recommend?

      ===
      Digress: Like you, I am sometimes saddened too, to see few/ none of the manga readers would pick up a vintage shoujo these days for whatever reasons…. I guess it will remain so as the “mainstream” (shoujo) manga continues to dominate the market! In fact, it is more of a shame that the current editors/ marketers of publishing houses have chosen to develop stories and characters purely based on considerations of popularity in the market. Well, nothing’s wrong with that considering businesses thrive to survive on commercial successes. But one could not help but ponder on sustainability of the manga industry, as most (if not all) of “classic” series being over-shadowed by the ‘mainstream” manga?

      Even more ironically, “shoujo manga” with a more serious tone or thought-provoking theme (aka a “slice of life” genre), such as HOT ROAD, would most likely be categorised as “josei” in these days, hence bring us back to the debate and issues about josei vs shoujo…..!!!

      Posted by xkazemg | October 26, 2011, 8:25 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Retro Shoujo – Vintage 70′s « [Manga Talk]…. blahs on some good old shojos~ - June 29, 2012

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